Sewing 101: Using Tricot Fusible Interfacing

Sewing 101: Using Tricot Fusible Interfacing

Created by: Chalk & Notch Patterns

I'm Gabriela from Chalk & Notch patterns, and I’ll be talking a little about my love for Tricot Fusible Interfacing. I personally recommend it in all of my pdf patterns, for both woven and knit designs. I thought I would explain a little about why I use it for most apparel projects, and show you a maxi dress I just made using Tricot and Cotton + Steel Menagerie Rayon Lawn!

Tricot

In case you are not familiar with Tricot Fusible Interfacing, it is a fusible interfacing that has 2-way or 4-way stretch and is traditionally used to stabilize knit fabrics. Fusible means that it will bond to fabric when heated with an iron. The great thing is that it works for woven apparel fabrics as well as knit fabrics.

Tricot

Left: FusiKnit Tricot Fusible
Right: Heat’n Bond Q2432 Tricot Fusible

There are so many different types of interfacing, and it can be confusing to decide which works best for your project. As a garment sewer, I use Tricot Fusible Interfacing for waistbands, collars, facings and plackets; I also use it as reinforcement for zippers, buttonholes and pockets. I work in both knit and woven fabrics, and I’ve found that Tricot Fusible Interfacing works for most of my needs. Plus, I like the convenience of keeping one type of fusible on hand. I started this practice because when I worked in the apparel industry at a custom dress shop, Tricot was all we used. In that shop, we never worked with knit fabrics, but we did work in leather, lace, denim, silk, rayon and lots of other apparel fabrics. For as long as I can remember, I’ve always used Tricot on woven fabric, and it wasn’t until recently that I realized that it wasn’t a common practice.

Tricot

You might be concerned that while Tricot has stretch, your woven fabric does not. Not to worry; since the interfacing is heat bonded to the fabric, it will only stretch as much as your fabric stretches, and most woven fabric has a bit of crosswise stretch or give in the weave. If you are sewing with knit, then Tricot is your best option for sure. When cutting, remember that Tricot has a grain, make sure to match the grain of the fusible with the grain of your fabric.

Tricot

When you use Tricot Fusible Interfacing, you can maintain the original drape of the fabric while adding stability and structure when needed. For this sample, I used the FusiKnit Tricot Fusible for the facings on my Fringe Dress. This collar shape in View B of the Fringe dress requires a nice, crisp corner, and the Tricot is able to do that without being too stiff. It also works for View A, which has a curved neckline, by stabilizing the center front button closure.

To illustrate how fabric fused with Tricot can still maintain most of the fabric drape, I cut 8" squares of this Cotton + Steel Menagerie Rayon Lawn in Monstera Midnight and tested a few fusible options, all from fabric.com. The sample on the left is the fabric without any fusible. The two center samples are Tricot options, and the far right sample uses a lightweight pellon fusible. You can see that the Tricot options look very similar to the fabric without any fusible. The Pellon option removes the natural drape of the fabric, and although it would still work for the Fringe pattern and most woven apparel projects, it’s just not my preference.

Tricot

1) Cotton + Steel Rayon Lawn - without fusible
2) FusiKnit Tricot Fusible
3) Heat’n Bond Q2432 Tricot Fusible
4) Pellon 906F Sheer Fusible Interfacing

After testing these two Tricot fusible options from Fabric.com, I would say both are very similar. If I had to pick, I prefer the FusiKnit Tricot Fusible with a little more 2-way stretch than the Heat’n Bond Q2432 Tricot Fusible, but both are comparable and I would recommend both.

Tricot

I hope this gives you the confidence to try Tricot Fusible Interfacing on your next apparel project when you would like to maintain the fabric drape and feel while adding stability. If you do, I’d love to know what you think! You can get in touch with me on Instagram or Facebook.

Happy sewing!

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