Fabrics to live for: Refashioned. Recycled. Certified.

Fabrics to live for: Refashioned. Recycled. Certified.

Fabric Certification 101:

STANDARD 100 by OEKO-TEX®

STANDARD 100 by OEKO-TEX® is one of the world's best-known labels for textiles tested for harmful substances. It stands for customer confidence and high product safety. Find out what STANDARD 100 means and why it is worth checking for this label when buying textiles.

What does the label mean?

If a textile article carries the STANDARD 100 label, you can be certain that every component of this article, i.e. every thread, button and other accessories, has been tested for harmful substances and that the article therefore is harmless for human health. The test is conducted by our independent OEKO-TEX® partner institutes on the basis of our extensive OEKO-TEX® criteria catalog. In the test they take into account numerous regulated and non-regulated substances, which may be harmful to human health.

In many cases the limit values for the STANDARD 100 go beyond national and international requirements. The criteria catalog is updated at least once a year and expanded with new scientific knowledge or statutory requirements. It is not easy for manufacturers and customers to keep an overview of the legal situation concerning harmful substances every day. Our experts from the OEKO-TEX® institutes do this for you.

Shop OEKO-TEX® certified fabrics here.

Global Organic Textile Standard: Ecology & Social Responsibility

The Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) is the worldwide leading textile processing standard for organic fibers, including ecological and social criteria, backed up by independent certification of the entire textile supply chain. Version 6.0 was published on March 19, 2020, 3 years after the Version 5.0 was introduced and 15 years after the launch of the 1st Version.

The high ecological and social requirements as well as worldwide practicability and verifiability were considered in the revision work, in order to achieve a reliable and transparent set of criteria. The information in this section provides an overview of the content and basic requirements of the standard. It does not reflect all criteria of the standard and can therefore not be used for any official purpose.

What does the label mean?

The consensus of the Founding Organizations was that a clear and unambiguous understanding of the content required that the Global Standard itself focuses on compulsory criteria only. The standard covers the processing, manufacturing, packaging, labelling, trading and distribution of all textiles made from at least 70% certified organic natural fibers. The final products may include, but are not limited to fiber products, yarns, fabrics, clothes and home textiles. The standard does not set criteria for leather products.

Shop organic fabrics here.

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